A new interactive data tool from Pew Charitable Trust shows a national problem on a state-by-state level: the incarceration of youth for status offenses and technical violations. Pew shares that “nearly a quarter of the 48,043 juveniles held in residential facilities across the U.S. on a single day in 2015 were confined for status offenses or technical violations of supervision, according to the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement from the Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.”

A technical violation is a violation of probation – including failure to pay restitution or missing a mandated curfew. A status offense is a crime based on age – charges like truancy and running away that are only crimes for minors. They are nonviolent offenses that pose little to no risk to public safety.

For #GirlsJusticeDay we replicated Pew’s data analysis but looked specifically at girls, who disproportionately end up in residential facilities due to status offenses and technical violations. Girls make up 15% of all youth in residential facilities, but are 38% of all youth in residential facilities due to a status offense, and 20% of all youth in residential facilities due to a technical violation. [see the data here]

The following data is from the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement from the Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The data represents a one-day count in 2015, the latest year for which this data is publicly available.

* Based on small number of girls in confinement (greater than 19, fewer than 100)
** Based on a very small number of girls in confinement (less than 19)

Note: The District of Columbia is omitted from this analysis because complete data on youth confinement in the city in 2015 were not available

Source: National Crittenton’s analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement.